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GARLAND COMMUNITY GARDEN EVENT

PLANT EXCHANGE AND GARDEN CHAT

 GALAND COMMUNITY GARDEN

4022 NAAMAN School Road (Brand and Naaman School Road

SATURDAY MAY 7 - 9AM TO  NOON
[If it rains, Sunday 1 to 4PM
 

I meet the most interesting people at the Garland Community Garden and they often inspire me undertake projects  I might not have otherwise done. Today  was one of those days.  Rich Resser stopped by the Garden today. Rich, like me, is a Garland resident and a gardener.

Rich and his girlfriend have a greenhouse where they grow orchids and other plants such as  aloe vera that they sell to local nurseries. I’m really looking forward to talking more with Rich on Saturday. After he left the garden today, I thought of so many nosey questions.  For example, do you think it would be possible for someone to make a living in Garland selling produce out of a greenhouse in their backyard?       

Rich has 34 tomato plants (a mix of cherry tomatoes and Beefsteak) to give away on Saturday as well as some watermelon plants that come with an interesting story.  I have about 50 luffa plants to share and also some lemon balm plants.  I’m sure other members of Loving Garland Green have plants to share too. Children are always welcome at the garden.  On Saturday it they want to perhaps they can plant some of Rich’s tomatoes in our area for children.

If you have ever grown wheat, I especially hope that you will come.  I would love to talk with you as I am planting a small field of winter wheat at the garden this fall.  If you want to learn more about this project, read my previous blog. It will be fun to watch it grow and follow the complete process for making it into flour.

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NOTES ABOUT LEMON BALM
I’ll bring some plants from my home too.  We have it growing all over the garden.  In our area it grows very well and is drought tolerant.

It was used as far back as the Middle Ages to reduce stress and anxiety, promote sleep, improve appetite, and ease pain and discomfort from indigestion (including gas and bloating, as well as colic). Even before the Middle Ages, lemon balm was steeped in wine to lift the spirits, help heal wounds, and treat venomous insect bites and stings. Today, lemon balm is often combined with other calming, soothing herbs, such as valerian, chamomile, and hops, to promote relaxation. It is also used in creams to treat cold sores (oral herpes).

Native to Europe, lemon balm is grown all over the world.  The plant grows up to 2 feet high, sometimes higher if not maintained. In the spring and summer, clusters of small, light-yellow flowers grow where the leaves meet the stem. If not carefully controlled, lemon balm can quickly become invasive in the garden. Often, people mistakenly think that lemon balm is invasive due to its roots, like its cousins peppermint and spearmint, but in fact it’s the seeds of the lemon balm plant that cause this herb to suddenly take over a garden. Removing the flowers of the plant as soon as they appear will make your lemon balm far less invasive.

 

 

 

RECIPE:  Lemon Balm Pesto

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup lemon balm leaves firmly packed
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts
  • 3/4 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 TB lemon juice
  • 1 tsp fresh chives
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

1.              Place all ingredients in a food processor and pulse until smooth.

2.              Add salt and pepper to taste.

3.              Store in an airtight container for up to one week in the refrigerator or 3 months in the freezer.

 

ENJOY THE PICTURES FOR NOW.
THEN COME ON SATURDAY TO SEE THE REAL THING AND MAYBE GET SOME FREE PLANTS!

Rich Resser in front of the Medicine Wheel at the Garland Community Garden

ORCHIDS  IN RICH'S GREENHOUSE

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, May 5, 2022