Blog
 
Gravatar

It's not even open and the Garland Community Garden is already producing--in fact, it's probably been producting for about 40 years.  The Texas Native Pecans in the bowl above came from one of the pecan trees on the proposed site for the Garland Urban Agricultural Center and Community Garden.  I picked them myself this morning and they are delicious.

11 People Showed Up at My Home Last Night (October 24, 2013)--I rounded out the count for an even dozen!

Charlie, Christine, Margie, Robert, Anita, Marie, Yolanda, Sandy, Daniel, Maq Sooda, Mark and me.   Robert Opel (a photographer, graphic artist and member of our planning committe) took photos of the group.  I'll post it here as soon as I get a copy from him.  Perhaps after you see how good-looking we all are you will want to join too.

Assignments were taken and our next meeting will be Wednesday, October 30, 6:30 at my home.  If you are a Garland resident and would still like to be on the Planning Committee for our Community Garden, we still have 8 places left.  Even after that, there will still be room for participation as each of these 12 to 20 members of the planning committee will be forming groups to accomplish their tasks.  I'm sure they will need all the help they can get.

1.  Obtain estimates for obtaining gravel for roadway on site.  - Charlie took this action item.

Note:  The walking paths between the beds will be mulch.  This gravel is for a roadway around the building and also for two small parking areas.  We currently plan to be able to park about 40 vehicles on the site.  When/if we have events there, we will work out something with the neighbors to park along the first two blocks of Kingsbridge since it is a wide street.


2. Cost to build sixteen 4' x 18'x 2' high beds--including wood and soil.  Anita

3.  Rain barrel and aquaponic setup research. - Mark jumped at the chance to do this one.

Also at the meeting, Charlie and Margie brought up two other possibilities for our water supply. Margie mentioned there is an old abandoned well on the site.  Perhaps we will be able to restore that well to its old glory.  Also Charlie mentioned that we might be able to pump water out of the creek and store it for later use in the garden.  We will have to check this out as diverting waterflow from the creek might affect lake levels elsewhere in the county.

Tonight Charlie and I plan to attend a Water Harvesting lecture at Brookhaven College in Farmers Branch.  Nate Downey, Landscape Design Expert and author of "Harvest the Rain" is the speaker for this two-hour presentaton about the emerging water harvesting industry.  For more information www.dccde.edu/cleaneconomyseries.

*4. Design a 20 x 20 Outdoors Enclosure for Classroom - (Assignment TBD)

Perhaps a recycled carport roof.  Also 30 chairs suitable for outdoor use and a white board.

*5. Greenhouse Research - (Assignment TBD)

Research cost for building an 18' x 30' greenhouse or hoophouse.

6. Website - Christine and Robert

We can have Facebook and Twitter, but we also need a website.

7. Fundraising - Liz

Many people are afraid to ask strangers for money.  I'm not.  I'm already working on our first fundraiser which will be ongoing from now up to Thanksgiving.  We will sell one-pound bags of these pecans in their shells for $3 a bag--a bargain if you consider this will help to fund a great venture to be used by all the citizens of Garland.

____________________________________________

PUT A PIECE OF GARLAND HISTORY INTO YOUR HOLIDAY BAKING

Buy Texas Native Pecans for your special holiday baking and support the development of the Garland Urban Agricultural Center and Community Garden!  


Note:  I'll work with Margie.  Also I'll contact Cleo Holden, president of Friends of Olde Downtown Garland.  Maybe Cleo will have some old photos when houses were still on this land or know of someone who does.  I would love to know and even obtain a photo of the person who planted these trees.  Robert (on our Planning Committe) has also promised to assist with the graphics.  Perhaps this Saturday I'll round up a few citizens  from 2 to 4 to help me gather the first batch.

___________________________________________________

The upcoming fundraiser for December will be the promotions of the Garland Bamboo Tea Company.  Then in Spring 2014 I hope to coordinate a DFW Community Garden tour for early June that features as many of the DFW Community Gardens who wish to participate.  I'm also hoping to publish a book (local Garland publisher) with photographs and stories of these gardens.  I'll begin organizing this fund-raising event in February.

Of course in between all this will be applications for Grant fundings which I will spearhead.  I hope to secure at least $100,000 for our Urban Agricultural Center by March of 2014.

8. Find out the steps we must take to set up as a nonprofit entity. - Marie Lowry

*9.  Affordable Housing - (Assignment TBD)

The need for affordable housing is great in Garland.  Over one thousand people are on a waiting list on the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program.  Affordable housing is just another aspect of healthy, sustainable living.  I would like to see a small (300 to 500 sq ft) home built on our site as a demonstration model.  These homes can be built for as little as $29,000.  I would like to see a local builder take interest in this concept and build five such homes on a common green (of course with a community garden).  Perhaps if one such home were built for demonstration, people could tour it. Then if they decide they would like this for themselves they could sign up, get local funding and the builder could build 5 homes at once--micro villages.  To get an idea of the structure of these homes, visit Tumbleweed Houses.

The goal of the Garland Urban Agricultural Center is more far-reaching than merely providing garden plots for individual citizens, although it is that too.  Our goal is to enhance the quality of life in our community, bring people together to solve local problems and to create jobs and strengthen our local economy by learning together new ways to solve old problems.

 *10.  Research steps for creating a Woodland garden in part of the Garland Community Garden.  (Assignment TBD--although Charlie did take home one of my books on the topic last night.)

Instead of battling against nature, the woodland garden works in harmony with it.  It comes down to selecting the right mixture of species from among approximately 2,100 that can be grown in the woodland.  Unlike the traditional gardens that we will also have, we won't have to replant our woodland garden area year after year because it contains perennial plants.  There are many more perennial edibles than many people realize.  

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest

Yesterday was the perfect weather for the Texas Veggie Fair at Reverchon Park in Dallas.  The only thing not perfect was the parking.  The only parking was on nearby side streets and my family and I had to park six blocks away and walk over broken sidewalks to the fair.  I'm glad that Charlie decided to not come with us. With his broken foot, he could not have walked the distance.  Still, even though I had to attend without Charlie, my visit to the Texas Veggie Fair was well worth the trip. It was very heartening to realize more fully just how deep and fast the river for rebuilding our food system is running.  If the Texas Veggie Fair is any indication, we can safely say that the food revolution here in our area is now on the fast track.

______________________________________________________________ 

Random Impressions from Iflizwerequeen

Those who don't believe the food revolution has arrived must not have attended the Texas Veggie Fair yesterday.  It was crowded and fun to see so many DFWites turning out for healthy lifestyles. Many of them even brought their dogs with them.  I estimate there were over 100 dogs at the event. 

 

Frankie petting one of the many dogs at the Texas Veggie Fair.

_________________________________________________________________

FOOD VENDORS AT THE TEXAS VEGGIE FAIR

Food Vendors Were Prominent and Popular--bringing revolutionary ways to rethink our food system

Of all the vendors, the vegetarian and vegan vendors were the most numerous. It was heartening to see long lines of people waiting to purchase their food. All types of food vendors were represented:  from culinary schools specializing in teaching preparation of vegetarian and vegan menus to food trucks that travel through DFW neighborhoods offering vegetarian and vegan food to organic urban farms.

The Good Karma Kitchen and Nammi Truck --revolutionizing the way we think of Food Trucks and Fast Food

The Good Karma Kitchen offers a gluten-free vegetarian and vegan menu.  Visit their website at The Good Karma Kitchen for more detail.  Also Nammi Truck and Gepetto's Pizza were featured at the Texas Veggie Fair.

 

Menu from the Good Karma Kitchen

The Nammi Truck -- a Vietnamese Fusion Truck serving up banh mi, vietnamese tacos, spring rolls and much more to the DFW metroplex.

 

Urban Acres - a busines model we will be seeing more of in the DFW area

Urban Acres is a farmstead opening in Oak Cliff in November.  They have recently signed a lease on a new location that will allow them to sell prepared food and beverages and experiment with aquaponic farming. Their funding efforts have  included Kickstarter.  The folks at Urban Acres have created a "co-op style" produce system that combines the best of a co-op, CSA, and farmer's market.  Visit their site to learn more about them.  http://urbanacresmarket.com/ 

 

Rabbit Food Grocery - a new business model for grocery stores

Speaking of new business models,  Rabbit Food Grocery, one of the featured vendors, is a great example. Although this grocery is local to Austin, those in the DFW can still order items online.  They haven't opened a brick-and-mortar storefront, yet. But while they are working on that, those in Austin can still get great vegan items from their online store or at one of their "Pop-Up Shops" around town. If you're local to Austin,TX, simply fill your online shopping cart and choose "Local Pickup" during checkout. There will be a box for you to write in your preferred day and time from our "Pop-Up Shop & Pickup Calendar" as well.  

Note from iflizwerequeen:  This is a model that can work well for DFW entrepreneurs as well as for our many local community gardens who have extra produce to sell.

 

The Natural Epicurean - located in Austin, Texas [Let's start a local version in the DFW area!]

The Natural Epicurean Academy of Culinary Arts offers a premier plant-based culinary education, one of very few in the country. They provide a comprehensive professional chef training program that focuses on the theory and practice of meal planning for plant-based diets, training chefs in the following disciplines:

  • Macrobiotic
  • Vegetarian
  • Vegan
  • Ayurvedic
  • Raw & Living Foods

 

Vegetarian and Vegan Restaurants were well-represented

 

The Veggie Garden is a vegan restaurant located at 16 West Arapaho Road • Suite #112
Richardson, TX 75080
(972) 479-0888

They were at the Texas Veggie Fair.  Veggie Garden helps to ensure a cruelty-free diet featuring authentic Cantonese cuisine.  Their mottos is "Food is the Best Medicine" and iflizwerequeen could not agree more.

 

________________________________________________________

RETHINKING OUR LIFESTYLES

Learning what it really means to "live well."

Living well is not just about eating more healthy.  It encompasses much more and many of the "much more" aspects of living well were also represented at the Texas Veggie Fair. Attendees were invited by the Extraordinary Health and Wellness Center of Plano to discover the five essentials of maximized living:  Maximized mind, maximized nerve supply, maximized quality nutrition, maximized oxygen and lean muscles, and minimized toxins.

 

Kindness to Animals Was Another Major Theme at the Texas Veggie Fair

Seventeen different animal rights and rescue groups provided exhibitions at the Texas Veggie Fair--from the Humane League to the Recycled Pomperanian Rescue.

Ariel chooses a T shirt to help spread the word about preventing animal cruelty.

 

Recycling organizations also provided Texas Veggie Fair goers with presentations on the importance of recycling and Brookhaven College was there to educate us about their clean economy series.  Upcoming on October 25 is a lecture:  Introduction to the New Water Economy.  For more information, call 972-860-4848.


Below Maria Lott of Recycle Revolution gives a thumbs up for recycling.  Here five-year-old company, Recycle Revolution is one of DFE's leading Zero Waste service providers who offer affordable, effective and responsible recycling and compost collection programs to businesses, apartments and condos.

 

Home, Health, Beauty and Clothing Products

Kobis kitchen for health, beauty and wellness.

_________________________________________________

Final Comments on the Texas Veggie Fair from Iflizwerequeen

There were over 85 vendors and exhibitors I counted at the Texas Veggie Fair. I'm sorry there is not room here for detail about all of them.  If you didn't go this year, I hope you'll make it next year when I'm sure it will be even bigger and better.  In closing, I will leave  you with  a vegan recipe for Chewy Vegan Brownies.

This is from the Action for Animals group.  If you make the brownies and like them, then send a donation to afa-online.org

 

CHEWY VEGAN BROWNIES

1 cup sugar                                           1/4 cup canola oil

1/3 cup water                                        1 cup flour

1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder      1 T ground flax seed

1/2 tsp baking powder                           1/8 tsp salt

Mix sugar, water, and oil until blended.  Add in the dry incredients and mix wel.  Pour into an oiled 6 x 9 inch pan and bake ad 350F fr 25 to 30 minutes.

[ Note from iflizwere queen:  Where is the sugar?  Laughing]

_____________________________________________________________________

PS:  MAYBE THE KIDS WILL SAVE THE WORLD

Being raised in a small town out in the sticks of West Texas, whenever I go to large events, I always expect to see somone I know.  I'm sorry to report that I didn't see a single person I knew other than those from my family who came with me.

However, upon leaving, Ariel ran into two of her friends.

 

Ariel and Erin (on the right) posing with two of Ariel's friends.

Gravatar

Spike, The Touchdown Tomato is the mascot and logo for the Paul Quinn College urban farm--known as the We Over Me Farm.  Spike is toting a turnip and spiking a football. The tomato is an appropriate logo considering that a vegetable patch occupies what was once a football field for Paul Quinn College--almost a sacrilege here in Texas.  But Spike pays a tribute to the farm's football roots so all's well.  Apparently the Cowboys' fans hold no grudge as many of them who attend Cowboy games also eat salsa made from vegetables produced at the We Over Me Farm.

______________________________________________________________


This morning, as part of our information gathering for the Garland Community Garden Planning Committee, Charlie and I visited the We Over Me Farm located on what was once the football field for Paul Quinn College. Unfortunately Charlie was not able to tromp around the farm with me because of a recent motocycle accident in which he broke his foot.  He was sidelined at a picnic area near the entrance to the farm but he was surrounded by several We Over Me "farm hands"--most of whom are students at Paul Quinn.  They were engaged in the task of washing and bagging vegetables for market. [Being the expert horticulturist that I am, I was amazed at the size of the "radishes" they were washing--until one of the students informed me the vegetables were turnips.]

According to their record-keeping,  this two-acre former football field farm has produced over 15,000 pounds of 100% organic produce since it began in March 2010.  The farm is also home to four active beehives that are maintained by members of the Texas Honeybee Guild, about 16 hens, at least one peacock, and an aquaponic system that supports approximately 100 tilapia fish.  This is all in addition to tomatoes, kale, turnips, radishes, onions, Swiss Chard,  mustard greens and basil currently growing on the farm.

Hannah Koski, a horticulture graduate from Cornell, has been the manager of this urban farm for the past four months.   She is one of many people who are growing this urban farm into a huge success.

In addition to Hannah, there are of course many of the students who attend Paul Quinn College who are helping to make this urban farm a success--a few of whom will be featured in this article.

Ashley Daly is another dynamo who is bringing the news of the We Over Me Urban Farm to the world. Ashley is in charge of media marketing and public relations for Farming at the Paul Quinn College. From the looks of things today, Ashley is doing a great job.  A team from PBS was at the farm interviewing and filming Hannah in the fields and later interviewing some Paul Quinn College students in the greenhouse where the aquaponic system is located.

Speaking of the greenhouse. . .It is huge and appears to be "nearly new" as there is a lot of unused space. Currently it houses an aquaponic tank filled with approximately 100 tilapia. The waste from the fish is nourishing seedlings that are housed in trays in another tank.  It appears that the tank is large enough to nourish at least twice the plants that are currently being fed by the system.  No doubt that will happen in the future.  Hannah mentioned that the other half of the greenhouse will be reserved for raised beds where tomatoes and other vegetables can be grown year round.  Aquaponic designers from the community are assisting in the design and expansions for the aquaponic systems.

 

Below is a photo of the tank that houses the tilapia.  It is located near the back of the photo shown above.

Volunteers and Students from Paul Quinn College contribute greatly to its growing success.  Below are featured a few of these people.

_______________________________________________________________

Claudea Locke, a Paul Quinn College student, is featured below with a "mess" of turnip greens.

 

____________________________________________________________________

Alyssa and Anacleto are two Paul Quinn College students featured in the next photo.  Anacleto is from Dallas, and Alyssa is a freshman who hails from Detroit.  She was convinced to attend Paul Quinn College when President Sorrell came and talked to a group of students in Detroit about the college, its commitment to community and the urban farm.

__________________________________________________________

Below is another of several students working at the farm this morning.  This young man is planting seeds.

__________________________________________________________________________

Chickens, yes the We Over Me Urban farm not only has chickens, they also have a peacock.  I didn't get the scoop on the peacock, but for some reason it does not live within the safety of the enclosure for the laying hens (currently numbering about 14).  I'll have to ask Hannah or Ashley for more information about this critter.

________________________________________________________________________

 Below is a photo of the Claudea washing and bagging the turnips (not radishes).

____________________________________________________________________

Here is photo of another Paul Quinn College student--Timothy Tucker.  Although Timothy grew up in nearby rural areas and knows a lot about farming, and even though the farm is one of the reasons he chose Paul Quinn College, this honors student is interested in marketing and hopes to one day land a job at Sony.  To get some experience in between here and there, Timothy is creating some informational brochures about the farm.

____________________________________________________________________

Cynthia Dade is a volunteer and supporter of the farm.  Cynthia reported that she and members of her family have purchased over 100 pounds of delicious watermelons from the farm.  I know where I'm coming next year for at least a few of my watermelons.  

Currently you can call We Over Me to place an order of basil, heirloom tomatoes, mustard greens, rosemary, specialty radishes, specialty turnips, swiss shard and organic free-range eggs.  Call to order and pick up by appointment:  (214) 379-5457.  You can also email Hannah at hkoski@pqc.edu to place your order.  Cash and checks are accepted.  Produce from the We Over Me farm is also sold at the White Rock Lake Farmers Market from 8AM to 1PM every Saturday!

 

_______________________________________________________

 Our last photo is of another Paul Quinn College student who also works on the farm:  Chakesha Smith.  Like many of the others, Chakesha proudly wears a shirt with Spike, the Touchdown Tomato.

 

Gravatar

Excited! Excited! Excited!

In addition to decorating Urban Garden One for Halloween [the garden that now takes up about 1/3 of what was once my front yard lawn] I've also been busy talking with various members of the Garland city government regarding the establishment of a community garden which will be located at 4022 Naaman School Road near the junction of Brand and Naaman School Road.

One of my concerns was the area proposed for us for this garden would be a flood plain.  However, just yesterday I learned, after talking with Thomas Guillory from the Garland Engineering Department, the flood plain is primarily located on the other side of Spring Creek--not on the side designated for the garden. The garden site is three acres of non-flood plain area.

A planning committee is being formed and we will have our first meeting at my home at 6:30 On Thursday October 24.  Thus far, there are ten people from Next Door who  have expressed an interest in being on the planning committee.  All interested citizens from Garland are welcome to participate in this venture.  If  you wish to be on the planning committee, please call me at 972-571-4497.  We will have to close invitations at 20 people but I'm sure as the plans expand that these people will form subcommittes as well.  There will be lots of opportunity for citizen involvement.

My vision for this garden involves more than creating 40 to 50 garden plots, although that will be part of our plan. 

I am hoping that we can create a space that will serve as a living demonstration center and incubator for innovations that will inspire solutions to eliminate food insecurity in all of Garland; provide affordable housing solutions for all our citizens; and will inspire citizens to create new businesses to meet some of the new demands generated by focusing on building a local plant-based economy.

At the moment,  I would like to see a space with at least 50 traditional garden spaces; at least one small home located on the site*; an area that holds three aquaponic tanks that are growing plants; an area where solar products can be demonstrated;  a small covered pavilion that can be used as an outdoor classroom; and an area that is designed as a self-sustaining edible forest.  [Note:  that is eventually what my Urban Garden One will evolve into.  Presently it is in the first year stage and it contains annual vegetables along with other perennials.  Eventually it will be all fruit and nut trees along with perennial vegetables -- a self-contained eco-system.]

_____________________________________________________

*Hand in hand with re-thinking our food system is re-thinking other healthier and more affordable approaches to living.  For example, most of us don't need nearly as much square footage as we currently build into our homes.  I would like to have a living demonstration of that in our garden.

The Harbinger

Estimated material Costs: $26,000 for 310 sq feet

This small home features a bump-out on the front that can be used as a sitting area or a sleeping area. It is large enough to fit a Queen size bed. There are 2 versions of this home: one measuring 310 square feet, and a 2nd version with an additional downstairs bedroom totaling 404 square feet. The plans come with an option for a full loft over the great room, kitchen and bathroom, or a 1/2 loft with a cathedral ceiling over the great room. The house is 16' 7″ tall

*This home (open for tours on the site of the Spring Creek Garden) would perhaps inspire a developer to create a small village of 5 of these homes on a common green.  The aquaponic tanks would inspire people to build their own aquaponic tanks at home and could even inspire the establishment of a small local business to build them.  These are just a few examples of the potential to inspire that can expand from our community garden.

_______________________________________________

Urban Garden One is all decked out for Halloween!

Located at my home 216 East Kingsbridge Drive Garland, this garden provides for about half of my meals and provides food for two other families.  Prior to my establishment of the garden beginning June 12, 2013, my lawn fed no one and cost me more to maintain than my garden.  It's interesting that previously I tried and tried to get a community garden going here in Garland. Then I gave up and out of frustration started my own version of one.  Lo and behold:  Four months later, I've gotten permission to establish a community garden on city-owned land. 

Here we have a glow-in-the-dark skull amongst the Okra.

Below we have a ghost amongst the eggplants.

No Halloween decorations would be complete without a zombie chasing a farmer.

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest

Update on Iflizwerequeen Urban Gardens:

Note: Gardens are located at 216 East Kingsbridge Drive, Garland Texas.  Garden One is in the process of replacing my entire front lawn.  This is the first garden I've ever grown.

Already the middle of October and my gardens are still producing.  Below is a photo of produce that I gathered yesterday from Urban Garden One (in the front yard where my lawn was):  Tomatoes, Siberian Kale, Eggplant and green Bell Peppers.

Okra keeps producing.  Urban Gardens One and Two are filled with okra and blooms that promise even more.  Below is a photo of an okra plant from Garden Two alongside my driveway.

About two months ago in early August I planted two standard sized pomegranate bushes in Urban Garden one and a dward pomegrante bush in Urban Garden Two.  Below are blossoms from one ot the standard sized pomegrante bushes in Urban Garden One.  The dwarf in Urban Garden Two already has formed two pomegranates.

______________________________________________________________________

A Few Lessons Learned So Far from My Gardens

Eggplants grow well in my gardens.

Okra grows well in my gardens.

Kale grows well in my gardens.

Cantaloupe grows will in my gardens

Blueberries, blackberries, almond trees, peach trees, and Pomegranates grow well in my gardens

Swiss Chard grows well in my gardens

Radishes grow well in my gardens

Anything on a vine grows poorly in my garden

Gravatar

I've definitely decided that Urban Garden One (where my front lawn once was) and Urban Garden Two (in the back of my house to the side of my driveway) are magical magnets for love and sharing.  To date, I've met 54 people who have stopped by to chat and talk with me since I began these gardens on June 12, 2013.  As I've mentioned, I've lived at this address for 8 years.  Prior to the planting of my gardens, not a single person ever stopped by to chat with me--not once in 8 years.  But then I wasn't out in my yard that often either prior to the gardens.

Most of these people, all complete strangers, have shared personal stories about their lives with me.  There must be something about a garden that exudes love and trust.  Perhaps human beings just intuitively know that someone who grows food is a person to be trusted.

Today I had yet another of these experiences. A couple from Pakistan (Daniel and Maq Sooda) stopped by.  They asked if they could have the large pods of okra I had drying out on a small shelf on my front porch.  I was drying them for the seeds, but believe me, I already have more okra seeds now than I'll have room to plant next year.  I explained to them they could cut the more tender okra from the stalks in my garden if they wished but the pods were too hard to eat.  They did want the tender pods, but also wanted the large pods as well.  

As most of the people who stop by, they educated me further in my knowledge of food and gardens.  One can eat okra seeds.  I did not know that.  I never even considered it.  I hope to learn more from Daniel's wife.  She mentioned that she cooks very spicy food.  Sunday they are celebrating their 32nd wedding anniversary and said they will bring by a dish for me--seems like I should be the one bringing food to them.  

I also gave them Siberian kale, spinich, swiss chard and eggplant in addition to the okra.  Daniel went to their car and gave me a large bag of cheese croissants and an entire carrot cake.  I protested their generosity as I live alone but they insisted.  As it turns out I was able to pass that food onto a couple I know who plan to go to a family gathering tomorrow.  It seems my garden has many ways to produce food in addition to the seeds I plant in its soil.    

About two months ago my garden introduced me to a man who is now very special in my life, but that's a story for another time.

But take it from me.  If you are really ready to change your life, I recommend that you start digging up your front lawn and replacing it with edibles.    Your life will never be the same.  I promise.

______________________________________________________________

SEPTEMBER SCENES FROM MY MAGICAL GARDEN OF LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP:  URBAN GARDEN ONE WHERE MY LAWN ONCE WAS

 FLOWERS FOR THE BEES.

 EGGPLANT (8 plants, two varieties)

 SIBERIAN KALE -
Very good in my salads!

OKRA SEEDS in my kitchen.  I just ate about 8 of them.  They taste somewhat nutty like buckwheat.  I wonder if I ground them in my coffee grinder if I could use them for flour?  At any rate, it's nice to know that I can eat the seeds of those pods that I allow to get to large to eat.  That's one less thing for me to feel guilty about.  Thank you Maq Sooda!

Maq Sooda and Daniel Shafi - Visitors to the Gardens of Love and Friendship.  Friday September 27, 2013.  Happy 32nd Anniversary on Sunday!  These two brought love and caring to me and my gardens today simply by being the example of what it looks like.  They referred to me as "sister"--so gentle and sweet.  We exchanged phone numbers and hugged like old friends when we parted.

Gravatar

As time marches on, my appreciation of my urban gardens deepen as well as my intent to eat local, eat organic, and eat vegetarian.  Just tonight I read that the USDA has approved a process whereby chickens grown and slaughtered in the USA will then be shipped to China for processing.  Absolutely unbelievable!  In the past year China has been caught passing off rat meat as mutton, selling sausages filled with maggots, and having an outbreak of H7N9 bird flue in live poultry.  Now they are going to be processing chicken for millions of Americans.  Certainly this should be a wakeup call for eating locally grown produce.

Labor Day weekend I decided to expand Urban Garden 1 which is located in my front yard.  I dug up a 20 foot by 40 foot area.  In it I've planted two grape vines, radishes (which are begging to be thinned)  french beans, more swiss chard, spinach, carrots, and artichokes.  All seeds have germinated.

The twins are doing fine.  Thus far, this one pot has produced three cantaloupes.  The previous one was delicious (and yes, I saved the seed).

Also on Labor Day weekend I planted some Siberian Kale.  Already I've had several salads using this delicious and nutritious green.  Below the Kale is a photo of some of the Swiss Chard that is also growing in my front yard.  Some of the leaves are now so large they will need to be cooked.  Chard leaves contain 13 different polyphenol antioxidants. One of the primary flavanoids found in Swiss Chard leaves is syringic acid which helps to regulate blood sugar and thus is a good source for blood sugar control.

Gravatar

SUNDAY MORNING HARVEST FROM URBAN GARDEN 1 - Enough for two meals.

Urban Garden 1 is the garden in my front yard that I'm currently converting from a lawn to a space that will eventually grow only edible perennials.  For this year and the next, as I establish the perennials, I'll allow a few annual edibles in this area.  Tomatoes, Okra, Bell Peppers, cantaloupe and beans are growing in this garden along side the developing shrubs, trees and perennials.

The resulting meals from this harvest will be prepared thusly:

1. Layer of Swiss Chard spread as bottom layer over the entire plate. (Buckwheat leaves, basil, and mint harvested from Urban Garden II beside my driveway will also be added.)

2. Chopped tomato and green bell pepper are placed on top of that layer.

3. Sauteed (in one teaspoon olive oil) sliced okra and onions poured hot over the greens.

________________________________________________________

NOTE:  When, for dessert,  I add a bowl with 8 ounces of non-fat greek yogurt and a few strawberries (from my garden)--I have a meal that supplies me with 100% of my daily requirements for vitamin C and about 50% of my daily requirements for many other essential vitamins and minerals.  In addition, I  have met my daily requirement for 58% of required protein.

I know that none of the vegatables I'm eating have been doused with chemicals and the only transportation requirements to get them to market (my dining table) are me and a wicker basket. I estimate that I have reduced by food footprint by at least 50%.

Gravatar

Food purchased this morning at the Garland Marketplace:  Clockwise from upper left-mesquite beans, red onions, duck eggs, cantaloupe, yellow squash and golden zucchini


The Garland Marketplace, located on the downtown Garland square, is held the third Saturday of the month from July through September.  This is a new venture and, depending upon the participation and support from local citizens, it will either grow into a regular once a week event in 2014 or fizzle out.

___________________________________________________

DUCK EGGS!  I bought a half dozen duck eggs this morning.  I'll let you know how they taste.  Zach Ragsdale of Ragsdale Farms assured me they are much higher in protein than chicken eggs and they will make breads and pastry much fluffier.  Have you ever eaten a duck egg? (If you are a vegan, just ignore my question.)

_________________________________________________________________

The plants you see in the photo above in front of Zach are small "Moringa Oleifera” trees.  The Moringa is considered one of the world’s most useful trees.  Every part of the Moringa Oleifera tree–from the roots to the leaves has beneficial properties that can serve humanity.  In many countries Morgina Olefera is used as a micronutrient powder to treat diseases.  

The Moringa is a shrub or tree that can reach 36 feet in height at maturity and can live for up to 20 years. Like bamboo and hemp, Moringa is among the fast-growing trees as it can reach 9 feet in just 10 months. The Moringa has deep roots and can survive drought conditions well.

And, according to the literature, Moringa can rebuild weak bones, enrich anemic blood and enable a malnourish mother to nurse her starving baby.  It’s full of nutrients. A dash of Moringa is staid to make dirty water drinkable.  In West Africa doctors use it to treat diabetes and in India they use it to treat high blood pressure.  It can staunch an infection and makes an efficient fuel, fertilizer and livestock feed.

I purchased one of these plants last month from Zach, and I'm happy to report that it's still alive and has grown about five inches.

__________________________________________________________

Mesquite Beans - I purchased a pound of mesquite beans this morning.

My father and grandfather--both of whom were wheat and cotton farmers in west Texas would be shocked and amazed to learn that I would pay $5 for a pound of mesquite beans. 

Turns out that people can make some money from mesquite beans.  If you don't believe me, go look on the Internet.  Mesquite flour sells for as much as $13.95 for 8 ounces.

Mesquite flour is said to not only be delicious but rich in soluable fibers, calcium, magnesium and it is gluten-free.  Mesquite pod flour, according to the literature, has a sweet, earthy taste with notes of cinnamon, molasses, and caramel. Mesquite flour is a great for a wide array of cooking and baking, and can be a valuable component of a gluten-free or diabetic diet.

You can use Mesquite beans to make a wide array of edibles--from chocolate chip cookies to wine.

Here is a good source for Mesquite bean recipes.  Lou Quallenberg Studios.

 

____________________________________________________

Golden Zucchini, yellow squash, red onions and cantaloupe were all purchased from the Esperanza Farms booth.

I've never eaten golden zucchini but I'll let you know what I think of it after I do.  The woman from Esperanca Farms assured me that it was sweeter and better than the green variety.

__________________________________________________

If you want to participate in the last Garland Farmer's Market for this year, Contact Kirk Lovett and reserve a space for the third Saturday in September.

Kirk P. Lovett
Eventive Marketing Solutions

kirk@eventivemarketingsolutions.com 

 

Gravatar

Two weeks ago today on Friday, August 2, inhabitants of The Garden of Eden, a small Intentional Community based on Sustainability, were awakened by a SWAT raid conducted by the City of Arlington for suspicion of being a full fledged marijuana growth and trafficking operation. Ultimately only a single arrest was made based on unrelated outstanding traffic violations, a handful of citations were given for city code violations, and zero drug related violations were found.

The entire operation lasted about 10 hours and involved many dozens of city officials, SWAT team, police officers and code compliance employees, and numerous official vehicles including dozens of police cars and several specialized vehicular equipment that was involved in the “abatement” operation. Witnesses say that there were helicopters and unmanned flying drones circling the property in the days prior to the raid that are presumed to have been a part of the intelligence gathering. The combined expenses for the raid itself and the collection of information leading up to the fruitless raid are estimated in the tens of thousands of taxpayer dollars.

All 8 adults present in the house were initially handcuffed at the gunpoint of heavily armed SWAT officers, including the mother of a 22 month old and a two week old baby who was separated from her children during the raid. The police enforced activity on the day of the raid included mowing the grass, the forcible destruction of both wild and cultivated plants like blackberries, lamb’s quarters and okra, and the removal of other varied materials from around the premises such as pallets, tires and cardboard that the Community members say they had collected for use in sustainability projects. No marijuana or other drugs were found on site and the inhabitants of the premises were all unarmed.

Source:  http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/tarrant/Owners-irked-after-raid-on-Arlingtons-Garden-of-Eden--219354841.html?c=n&fb=y&can=n 

________________________________________________________

IFLIZWEREQUEEN COMMENTS

The raid on the Garden of Eden farm appears to be the latest example of police departments using SWAT teams and paramilitary tactics to enforce less serious crimes.  

For example, other SWAT team raids have been conducted on food co-ops and Amish farms suspected of selling unpasteurized milk products. 

As long as we do nothing as individual citizens to stop these ridiculous affonts to our civil liberties, you can expect them to increase and worsen in intensity.  Police Departments such as demonstrated by the one in Arlington Texas are like a junior Bruce Willis with a new toy. I wonder, for example, how many citizens of Arlington know their city government owns two drones?  Yes taxpayer money was used to purchase drones! Yes, it was a federal grant, but that grant was supported with money that local citizens paid for with their federal taxes.  Source:  http://www.star-telegram.com/2013/03/07/4668689/faa-approves-arlingtons-drones.html 

What can people do?  First of all, they can start standing up to these bullies by attending city council meetings, and demanding that these activities against local citizens end.  Just because the leadership of a community does not agree with the lifestyle of a group of its citizens, does not give them the right to send in strom troopers to tear up their homes and property.  Local is where all power begins--with you and your community.   

It is absurd that in the city of Dallas we have over 300,000 children living below the level of poverty--enough to fill the Cowboy stadium more than twice--and local governments in the area are spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on SWAT teams to harass local citizens and drones to spy on them.  Absolutely absurd.  These people need a lesson in how to set priorities.