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The 52nd Dallas YMCA Turkey Trot will take place at 9 a.m., November 28, at Dallas City Hall Plaza. Close to 23,000 participants are expected to turn out for the eight-mile race and 5K fun run and the Junior Trot for 6-to-11-year-olds. The Dallas YMCA Turkey Trot benefits programs that strengthen the foundation of our community. All registered participants receive a commemorative medal and T-shirt.
 
The Roost is a gathering place for families, runners and walkers to fuel up before The Trot. Breakfast, coffee and hot chocolate will be served, along with Michelob ULTRA, wine and mimosas will be available for purchase. A variety of food trucks will be on hand on Young Street between Marilla and Akard, behind the Dallas Police Memorial, before and after the run or walk.
 
For more information, call 214-954-0500. To register, visit TheTrot.com.

 

 

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Healthy Living Healthy Planet Radio, with weekly broadcasts on iHeart talk radio 1190AM at 3 p.m. Saturdays, is about more than just the environment. It’s more than just healthy living. Host Bernice Butler and featured guests examine topics that relate to the relationship between humans and our planet. Each one-hour program goes beyond the headlines to explore how myriad environmental issues we face today—climate change, plastic pollution, renewable energy, water, food justice and more—affect the health and well-being of each and every one of us.

 
Through relevant and engaging dialogue, Butler and weekly experts educate, inform  and sensitize listeners while offering energizing insights and positive solutions. Healthy Living Healthy Planet Radio is independent of special interests. Their interest is in helping to objectively frame environmental and health issues in a way that ordinary people see the need to help.
 
Healthy Living Healthy Planet Radio helps readers explore themes like climate change, plastics contamination, heatwaves and other extreme weather events and many others, as well as meeting everyday impacts like allergies and asthma, indigestion and gut health , cancer, lung and heart issues and more. Butler says, “The conversation starts here, but our goal is for it to continue in your home, in our social circles, our workplaces and at the water cooler.”
 
For nearly a decade, Butler has been the publisher of Natural Awakenings - Dallas Metroplex Edition magazine,  the premiere green, healthy and sustainable living publication in north Texas. Her commitment to sustainability and social justice runs deep; she was a senior fellow with a public policy think tank, leading regional and national policy initiatives to rebuild cities with environmentally friendly virtues while staying socially equitable and economically profitable. She led a groundbreaking initiative to get philanthropic foundations to invest in blind-pool real estate investment trusts for inner city neighborhoods and emerging growth area redevelopment projects.
 
Butler was a regular guest on Shootin’ the Breeze, a show dedicated to renewable energy and related topics, that ran on KLIF-570. As a long-time supporter of green, environmental and sustainable causes, she continues her green quest through Healthy Living Healthy Planet Radio.
 
For information on previous and future guests and to listen to podcasts of previous shows, visit HealthyLivingHealthyPlanetRadio.com.

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Resource One hosts several free document shredding events throughout the year to watch as documents containing sensitive and personal information are safely destroyed. No sign up is necessary. The limit is five boxes per vehicle.
 
Paper documents only are allowed—no plastic bags, trash bags, or baggies; boxes; trash of any kind; binders; and metal such as binder clips (staples and paper clips are acceptable).
 
The next shred events are scheduled from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. November 9, at 2750 N. Galloway Avenue, in Mesquite; 2475 Arapaho Road, in Garland; 2315 West Airport Freeway, Suite 161, in Irving; and 755 North Highway 67, in Cedar Hill.
 
For more information , visit Tinyurl.com/ShreddingEvents call any Resource One branch office.

 

 

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Last year, the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD) began exploring the social justice aspects of sustainability by hosting several events designed to spark conversations and ideas among students and employees. A 2019 DCCCD Sustainability Summit from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., November 8, at Eastfield College, will address solving climate change and creating a cleaner, healthier and safer world that works for everyone. “Although these problems are complex and the goals are audacious, everyone in the community can be a part of solving issues related to sustainability,” says Georgeann Moss, Dallas DCCCD executive administrator of sustainability. “For Dallas County residents to survive and thrive, we need a strong economy, a healthy environment and the peace of mind that comes from feeling safe in our communities.”
 
This year’s theme is Sustainability as a Social Justice Practice: Developing Resilient Strategies. The purpose is two-fold: provide information and resources to community members that want to learn about sustainability and inspire participants to become active in the quest to achieve sustainability in Dallas County. Ian Garrett, an associate professor at York University, in Toronto, will deliver the keynote address. His expertise is sustainability in arts and culture.

DCCCD uses and supports the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals (dcccd.edu/dallassupportssdgs) as a teaching and learning framework, with special emphasis on quality education, an end to poverty, zero hunger, decedent work and economic grown, reduced inequalities as well as peace, justice and strong institutions.

Admission is free and the public is invited, but registration at dcccd.edu/sustainabilitysummit by Nov. 4 is required to receive a complimentary lunch. Location: 3737 Motley Dr., Mesquite.

 

 

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Disc herniation, or bulging of the discs, most commonly occurs in the lumbar spine (lower back) and typically develops due to the displacement of disc material beyond the space of the intervertebral disc. The spine is a collection of individual vertebrae that are stacked on top of each other from the neck to the buttocks. The intervertebral disc is the region between each vertebra that provides support and cushioning to prevent rubbing of vertebrae.
 
The intervertebral discs contain a gel-like material called a nucleus pulposus (similar to the oil present in the shock absorbers of vehicles). It is responsible for reducing friction between the vertebra and provides lubrication to aid in spinal movement. The rupture of the coverings through the outer layer of the disc surrounding this gel-like substance results in the herniation of a disc. Disc herniation may result in symptoms that include debilitating lower back pain that can make daily activities challenging to perform.
 
A herniated disc may have many primary and associated symptoms, but the lower back pain is usually the first symptom. In a majority of cases (mild to moderate), this pain will last for a few hours to days, and then subside without any medical or surgical intervention. However, weakness of a lower extremity, leg pain and numbness or tingling often follow.
 
In more than 50 percent of cases, the leg pain ultimately travels beneath the knee and can involve the ankle and foot. Loss of bowel or bladder control from compression of the surrounding nerves is a rare symptom of lumbar disc herniation that may indicate a more serious problem that needs immediate surgical attention.
 
Research and clinical trials indicate that the herniated disc is responsible for a large number of cases of the back, leg, neck and arm pain syndromes. Because the intervertebral discs don’t have their own blood supply, they do not receive oxygen and nutrients directly. They use a diffusion process created by decompression and motion to enhance healing and restore nutrients. According to a recent study, specific exercises and combination of stretches is an effective option to relieve lower back pain. However, all cases don't well respond to these exercises and require additional therapeutic procedures to improve function in persons with symptomatic disc herniation.
 
One of the safest, effective and non-invasive back therapy to reverse disc herniation is spinal decompression therapy. It uses an U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved machine and specifically designed technique to gently and gradually stretch the spine. This stretching ultimately lessens the load on the herniated disc (compressed nerve root) and can result in a reduction or even absolute alleviation of pain.
 
Decompression therapy, also known as IID therapy, is cheaper than long-term use of pain medications and surgery. It is non-invasive, completely drug-free and requires no extensive recovery time. The prognosis rate is very high, as it can help 80 to 95 percent of people suffering from chronic back or leg pain due to disc injury.
 
Those suffering from herniated discs, degenerative disc disease or bulging discs should consult an experienced chiropractor. Many proven alternatives to expensive prescription pain medications and invasive back surgery are available. The discovery of the right herniated disc treatment solution, like spinal decompression therapy, can dramatically provide pain relief and improve a patient’s quality of life.
 
Mathew Gutierrez, DC, is the owner of Whole Earth Partners, located at 6211 W. Northwest Hwy., Ste. 159, in Dallas. For appointments and more information, call 214-368-3030 or visit WholeHealthPartners.com.

 

 

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AT&T Stadium has an expanded vegetarian, healthy and innovative global cuisine menu  for the 2019 Dallas Cowboys NFL season. Organic produce is grown byWE Over Me Farm, at Paul Quinn College.
 
New offerings include Burger Hand Pie, Cowboys Cheesesteak Hand Pie, Vegetarian Bulgogi Hand Pie, Korean BBQ Brat, Chicken Fried Steak Sandwich, Vegetarian Portobello Burger, Quinoa Salad, Grain Bowl, Grilled Chicken Salad, Texas-Style Taco Salad, Chicken Fajita Salad, California Turkey Wrap, Chicken Caesar Wrap, Protein Box, Yogurt Parfait and Fruit Cup.

For more information, visit Stadium.DallasCowboys.com.

 

 

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Big Saturday college football games are part of the run of the State Fair of Texas , which began in September  with the Southwest Airlines Classic between Prairie View A & M and Grambling State University.  Dallas Area Regional Transit (DART) wants to guarantee riders an enjoyable game day experience and has volunteers stationed throughout the system ready to help. Game days typically attract some of the largest State Fair crowds, so DART encourages people to allow extra time. Plan ahead by checking BigTex.com for game times.
 
October 12 features the AT&T Red River Showdown between the Texas Longhorns and Oklahoma Sooner, and DART has modified train and bus service (DART.org/redrivershowdown). The State Fair Showdown on October 19 pits the Southern University Jaguars against the Texas Southern University Tigers.
 

For more information, visit DART.org/statefair. 

 

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The largest, longest-running event in North Texas celebrating cultures around the world, the 15th annual Plano International Festival is from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., October 12, at Haggard Park. The grassroots, all-volunteer event manifests a passion for diversity and inclusion features food, music, dance, displays and science activities that bring the community together to foster communication and understanding between cultural groups.

A Fitness and Wellness Fair is at the adjacent Courtyard Theater and Cox Playhouse from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. with flu shots for adults and flu mist for kids, free screenings for blood pressure, diabetes, bone density, BMI, cholesterol, HIV and more. There will be dental and vision screenings for kids as young as 6 months old and pre-screening for qualified women to get free mammograms at a later date. Massages, CPR demos and lessons about healthy eating, poison prevention, breast feeding support, free home repairs, affordable health services for kids, stroke signs, cancer education and more are all part of the fair.

In addition to a comprehensive waste reduction program, the festival has green living exhibits, tips for how to live with zero waste and eco-friendly children’s crafts.

Admission and services are free. Location: 901 E. 15th St., Plano. For more information, visit PlanoInternationalFestival.org.

 

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Texans have been hearing for many years that our state’s climate is changing for the worse. According to an August 2016 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report, most of Texas has warmed between one-half and one degree Fahrenheit in the past century. Yet, many allow this to fall on deaf ears.

 
A Santa Cruz, California-based solar panel company, Sandbar Solar, recently did a survey that shows a lack of knowledge about climate change exists. Fifty-eight percent of people were not knowledgeable that, among other things, the use of fossil fuels, deforestation and agricultural activities, cause global warming. Forty-four percent think that the climate is warming because of recurrent weather patterns. Seven percent think the sun is getting hotter. Another 7 percent think the Earth is moving closer to the sun. Sad news, indeed, knowing that environmentalists are making a concerted effort to spread the truth.
 
In Texas, a few things that are happening under our noses that a great many people take for granted. In Texas’ eastern two-thirds, even with increased rainfall, the soil is becoming drier. Rainstorms are more intense and flooding more severe. In coming decades, storms will likely be more severe, deserts may expand and farmers will face increasingly hot/dry, causing agriculture problems. Some people may possibly suffer health problems due to this.
 
Our Earth is warming, therefore, the climate is changing. Since the late 1700s, we have increased carbon dioxide in the air by 40 percent. Other greenhouse gases are also increasing, warming the surface and lower atmosphere about one degree over the past 50 years. On our coasts and otherwise, we experience increased humidity, average rainfall and heavy rainstorms as evaporation increases and the atmosphere warm. Drought also affects some areas.
 
Visitors to our beaches see that sea levels are rapidly rising. Climate change and groundwater pumping cause sinking. If oceans and atmosphere continue to warm, sea level might possibly rise two to five feet in the next century.
 
Wetlands and dry land will submerge, beaches will erode, coastal flooding will worsen and many dependent birds and fish will suffer. Public access to beaches and tourism will be hampered.
 
Coastal homeowners and businesses know that for the past 20 years, tropical storms and hurricanes have caused massive repair and cleanup. Warming oceans cause high waves to lash out while scientists scratch their heads as to whether or not the intensification will be long-term. Nonetheless, it looks as if hurricane wind speeds and rainfall rates will increase as our climate temperature continues to climb.
 
Not only will more powerful storms cause flooding, but sea levels will rise as storm surges become higher. Coastal homeowners and businesses will see their insurance deductibles increase. Cities, transportation systems and coastal oil/gas facilities are vulnerable, causing people to relocate; possibly creating some climate change refugees.
 
The changing climate will likely increase inland flooding, as well. The last 50 years in the Great Plains shows that rainfall during the wettest four days of the year increased about 15 percent, which will likely increase and cause more flooding.
 
Water will become less available. Warmer temperatures increase evaporation, causing vegetation/soil problems. All seasons will see less rainfall. Research shows that 70 years from now, the longest period without rain annually is likely to be at least three days longer than today. Both increased evaporation and decreased rainfall reduce the average flow of rivers and streams.
 
The 14 percent of Texas farmers that irrigate crops won’t have sufficient water. Panhandle and to-the-south plains farmers know that most irrigation water is groundwater from the High Plains Aquifer System, which is becoming depleted. Since the 1950s, stored water in the aquifer has declined by more than 50 percent in certain areas of Texas. These are just a few perils that face us because of climate change.
 
For more information, visit Tinyurl.com/TexasClimateChangeReport.
 
For more information about climate change, global warming, how they affect our health and why we should care about it, tune in to Healthy Living Healthy Planet Radio from 3 to 4 p.m. Saturdays, beginning October 5 on iHeart Radio, KXFR 1190 AM, streaming simultaneously on the iHeart Radio App. A podcast will be available at HealthyLivingHealthyPlanetRadio.com.

Minnie Payne is a Texas-based freelance writer and contributing writer to Natural Awakenings magazines and other green living publications.

 

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Sep 30 @ 8:00 am
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The 10th annual DFW Solar Tour will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., October 5, at a selection of innovative homes and buildings throughout the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex. Thousands of visitors have already toured homes, schools, libraries and other energy-efficient, sustainable buildings to see what forward-thinking people in North Texas are doing to build a self-sufficient, renewable sustainable future.

The strategies and techniques on display range from changing to LED light bulbs and selecting more efficient appliances to cutting-edge, ultra-efficient eco-homes and businesses that generate as much or more energy than they consume.

The DFW Solar Tour is organized by the nonprofit volunteer-based North Texas Renewable Energy  Group, Inc., in cooperation with the Texas Solar Energy Society and the American Solar Energy Society National Solar Tour. The National Solar tour is the largest grassroots renewable energy event in the nation, with more than 165,000 participants expected to visit some 5,500 buildings in 3,200 communities across the U.S. The DFW Solar Tour is the fifth largest solar tour in the country.

For more information, visit dfwsolartour.org.

 

 

For more stories like this read Natural Awakenings Dallas-Ft Worth magazine at NADallas.com